Wild

 Today we have severe gale force winds with gusts of around 65 mph.  A bit of a let-down after yesterday's bright, sunny weather.

P went to visit a friend this morning to play chess so I was home alone, but the weather provided me with a little entertainment.  

As the gusts grew stronger and stronger I looked out of the window to see that the sturdy plastic lockable garden store that our neighbours, Mr & Mrs Three-Sheds. had left lying around in their garden was being blown around by the gusts.  As I watched, it was sent tumbling head over heels towards our boundary.  It is quite a large, heavy duty box so the sight was pretty alarming. At one point it became lodged against the fence, then another gust lifted it into the air, ripped off both doors and flung them over the fence into our garden, where they rolled over and over before becoming wedged against one of the apple trees.  The box was still leaping and bounding in the air, trying to vault over the fence to join its doors.

Eventually the doors shook themselves loose from the tree and continued their journey towards our greenhouse. I grabbed my wellies and strode out across the bog patch that used to be our lawn. I managed to wrestle with the doors and dragged them up into the workshop beneath the house, locking them in for safety.

i returned to the house and nervously watched the box as it continued its frantic efforts to leap over the fence.  Suddenly, a particularly strong gust of wind picked it up and tipped it unceremoniously over the fence - into our other neighbours' garden where it lodged itself amongst their shrubbery. Phew!  A lucky escape.

When P returned home he told me that the road back from Peel was strewn with wheelie bins and other detritus from people's gardens.  Quite a danger to traffic I would think.

The winds are forecast to die down overnight, but I wonder what damage will be wreaked in the meantime.

32 comments:

  1. I love how you have christened your neighbour Mr & Mrs Three Sheds,JayCee. It's been rough here too on the Irish Riviera. We had a couple of hot Grouse whisky toddy's last night. It's a great way to sleep through a gale.

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    1. That sounds like a good plan, Dave.
      Hope all your garden contents stay on your side of the fence!

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    2. Even our homemade polytunnel patch worked.

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  2. At the same time as reading this the lunchtime weather forecast is telling me how wet and windy it is where you are!

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  3. JayCee - your excellent description of the episode makes it sound like a series of scenes from a comic movie - Im sure it didn't feel like that to you.

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    1. It was certainly a little disconcerting watching that huge garden storage box trying to leap over the fence. It could have caused a fair amount of damage. The doors were heavy enough on their own.

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  4. Clearly wind that strong is a rare thing is so much stuff is not tied down. Slalom for road users, and one way to acquire a shed in your back yard. Your name for your neighbours put us in mind of the woman at our allotments that we used to refer to as Mrs Pink Shed. Hours spent building a bright pink shed, never worked on the allotment.

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    1. Thank goodness these three sheds are not bright pink!!!

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  5. Dear JC,

    How intrepid you are to have gone out in such weather to retrieve the doors....double doors by the sound of them!! Rather like adventurers of the past nearing the summit of some Himalayan peak, we can picture you striding forth in your wellington boots, marching into the teeth of the gale and whisking those doors into safety. Marvellous. This is the stuff of a television thriller:):):)

    And, what, we ask, do we think of Mr. and Mrs. Three Sheds? Well, surely, one shed is sufficient for anyone's needs, but to have three must be considered to be something of an extravagance. So, what do they keep in these three sheds? How are the sheds furnished or are they simply for storage? How big are these sheds? What are the sheds made of? Do the sheds have windows and, if so, are the windows curtained?

    Dear JC, you have left us with so many more questions than answers and we look eagerly for the next instalment of Jay Cee, P and the Three Sheds.

    Do take care in the wind. Stay safe, dear virtual friend.

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    1. I did feel quite intrepid at the time.
      The three sheds are rather large wooden constructions which were erected directly in line with our previously unhindered view of the sea, hence our antipathy towards them.
      P called it the Stalag when they were first put up.
      As far as we can make out, two of them house all the boys' toys; jet skis, motorbike, mowers etc, whilst the third housed three small ponies for a time.
      I am not sure why they also needed that huge plastic store as well, but it is now in kit form, spread amongst various neighbours' gardens.

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    2. Darling JC,
      How we have laughed and laughed at this reply of yours!!

      You have every reason to feel very intrepid never mind the 'quite' venturing out into the "beast from the East' storm. And, from what you write, 'The Stalag' seems a very polite way to describe the antics of your neighbours.

      It is quite a list of 'toys'...the jet skis etc....obviously, the jet set live next door to you!!

      And, Mr. and Mrs. Three Sheds really do seem to do things in trios. First sheds, then ponies and we presume that the boys are triplets just to keep everything in the same pattern.

      Well, we are delighted to learn that the huge plastic store has ripped itself to shreds and can only hope that the fate of the three sheds will be similar.

      Indeed, we must confess that, if we were you, under the cover of night, [not in a storm]we should be very tempted to claim back our sea view by deconstructing the three sheds and filling up our log store with the proceeds.

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  6. Nice to know people take chess seriously. My son and I (he loves in China) always have a game on the go online. He's good - I have yet to beat him! I always make a silly move at some point. I guess even good players do but because he's so good, it usually spells catastrophe for me when I do!

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    1. P enjoys a game of chess and has been lucky to find someone locally he can pit his wits against. The friend's brother is actually a chess tutor who lives in Scotland. P was very pleased to have won a game against him for the first time today.

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  7. Well at least you went out and saved the day instead of sitting indoors like a wimp complaining about it. I am impressed. Mostly blogs are where people like to complain and apportion blame about everything/ In fact I am very impressed JC. x

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    1. Why, thank you Rachel. I think if P had been at home I would have sent him out there to save the greenhouse.

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  8. You described it all so well and I can picture you bravely going out to grab the doors before they damaged your garden or home. You could have been injured if the gust had lifted you with the doors over the next fence and on to who knows where?! What an adventure!

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    1. Yes, it was tricky grappling with the doors as they were quite heavy and the wind was trying to pull them from my grasp. I didn't want them to go crashing into the greenhouse... or our windows!

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  9. After reading in your response to a comment that the installation of those three-sheds blocks your view of the sea, I am amazed at your civil terminology. Mine would not be so nice.

    We have frequent gale warning here (near Ches. Bay)--one today as a matter of fact--so we are careful about keeping items secure. Would that our neighbors would be so careful. Frequently have to toss their unsecured belongings back onto their property. Glad you were able to avoid damage, but not fun for you to go out in that weather.

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    1. I was lucky that the rain had stopped at that point so I didn't get wet.

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  10. Wow. That's some gale. Reminds me of the great storm of October 1987 down here when Sevenoaks became Oneoak. I loved the description of the little shed dancing about on the other side of the fence to join the doors. I think I'd have been scared of it colliding with the greenhouse too.

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    1. It really did appear to be alive and trying to jump over the fence!

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  11. Whew that was quite a gale. Pity it didn't flatten the other two . Bravo for saving your glasshouse . Could have been a disaster

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  12. Such excitement! Glad nothing was damaged and no one was hurt = except the shed of course!
    xxx

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    1. Serves them right for leaving it lying around in a gale.

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  13. I applaud the speed with which you stole the neighbours' doors. Funny how you were battling the elements while Lord Peregrine of Peel was safe indoors playing chess with his chum - The Baron of Kirk Michael.

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  14. Now that was quite a gale tale!

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  15. We've had strong winds for three days. One neighbour had a big white tent
    (more of a marquee) in his garden, which we were pleased to see blew away! Horrible ugly thing, it used to annoy me every time I saw it.

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Although I am quite used to talking to myself, any comments on my posts are very welcome, provided they are not abusive. I do reply to them so please check back. It's good to talk (!)