Maughold Head

This morning started grey and mizzly so I just had a short trot to the shops after P came back from his morning run.

After lunch the sun had begun to push through the low cloud so P suggested a short drive around the headland to Maughold (pronounced Mack-old) and a walk to the lighthouse.

We parked in the village car park and strolled up the pretty lane to Maughold Church.




Visit Isle of Man has this to say about the area....

Kirk Maughold Church is one of the oldest churches on the Island and it is the site of vast importance for the Island's history, heritage and culture with elements dating back to the sixth century.    The church was founded approximately 447 A.D. by Celtic St Maughold who was expelled from Ireland by St Patrick and landed on the coast here towards the end of the 5th century, bringing Christianity with him. This site on the headland became one of the most important sites of the early period and was regularly frequented by pilgrims across the ages, before being commissioned as a church in the 12th century by Viking King Olaf I.   The Church contains a large number of historically important Celtic crosses from the early Christian period (6th-13th Century) and the ruins of three keills, suggesting that it was the site of an early Christian monastery and the main pre-Norse religious community on the Isle of Man.   Nowadays, the crosshouse in the churchyard contains almost a third of all pre-Norse cross slabs found on the Island, including the Pillar Cross which is the only remaining parish cross on the island and depicts the oldest stone-carved example of the three legs of Mann symbol on the Island.










Other points of interest include the poignant War memorial in the churchyard ... 































Leaving the churchyard from the far gate, we walked up the path to the lighthouse, where P spotted a peregrine falcon perched, looking perhaps for seabirds that were nesting there on the cliffs.







It only took us an hour for this short amble but it had just started to rain as we reached the car so we were happy to drive the five minutes back home to tea and shelter.


26 comments:

  1. So much to see on your Isle! Amazing views!

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    1. There is a wealth of Celtic and Viking history here, as well as pretty scenery x

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  2. Fairy's Fingers - Foxgloves. Awesome photo/s JayCee.

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    1. Thanks Dave. I haven't heard them called Fairy's Fingers before.

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  3. Moving to a rented house seems to have put you in permanent holiday mood.

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    1. Yes, we feel in a kind of limbo, as though we are on an extended stay in a holiday home.

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  4. If you are getting rain it does sound as though it has drifted West and left us behind after one short shower. We are really desperate for rain.

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    1. It is now raining quite steadily and has done so overnight. It looks set to last into tomorrow.

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  5. Oh how I am missing my visits to the Island.

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    1. Well, if you have had both vaccinations you can now travel here with no restrictions!

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  6. Oh Wow! I hadn't realised the rule shad changed. Last time I checked the restrictions were very tightly controlled. Thank you

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    1. Jacqui... here is a link to the details...
      https://covid19.gov.im/general-information/travel-advice/borders-framework/border-level-15-faqs/

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  7. Nice blogpost JayCee.

    I wonder why Maughold was expelled from Ireland by Bossy Boots (St Patrick)? Perhaps he had been smoking behind the bike sheds or maybe he punctured the headmaster's tyres.

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    1. Professor Google tells me...
      The legend about Maughold or Machalus is that he was an Irish prince who was a pirate. It is said that St Patrick baptised him and then urged him to change his life: as a penance for his previous crimes, Patrick ordered him to abandon himself to God in a wicker boat without oars. Maughold is said to have come ashore on the Isle of Man at the headland known today by his name. He entered into a cave in the mountains there and lived a life of austerity and piety. He was eventually chosen by the local people as their bishop.

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    2. Excuse me? Wouldn't a wicker boat leak?

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    3. Well, he was a saint after all.

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    4. YP, he would have used plastic sheeting on the outside but it hadn't been invented so he used pelts instead (hopefully after the occupants had been killed and eaten). However, as a Saint has to have performed a miracle perhaps surviving was that miracle.

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  8. Definitely an hour well spent! Wonderful vistas and a look back in time. Thanks for the photos. Helps to imagine myself on the top of some of those hills looking out and land and sea.

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    1. It will be a bit damp up there today. It's been steadily raining all day, and chilly too.

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  9. What a beautiful place! I can't imagine living just 5 mins. from such awesome scenery. Love the signage - people must always take care of wildlife and plants.

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  10. Interesting about the Viking King Olaf in the 12th century. Did he control the island at that time?

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    1. Yes he was King of Mann and the Isles. It seems that he was assassinated by three of his nephews in 1153 but then his son managed to seize back the Kingdom. It was pretty rough back then!

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  11. That was a very enjoyable walk. Thank you.

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  12. Looks like a fab walk with wonderful views. The church and graveyard looked fascinating.
    xx

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Although I am quite used to talking to myself, any comments on my posts are very welcome, provided they are not abusive. I do reply to them so please check back. It's good to talk (!)