Blue Point

This morning, to cheer ourselves up, we decided to take a little drive out to Blue Point on the north west tip of the island for a walk along the shore.

The sky was dull and overcast and light showers were forecast for midday so we left straight after breakfast.

The drive out past the old Jurby airfield and the Jurby Hilton (aka the prison) only took around 12 minutes. We bumped the car along the rutted and pot holed track down to the dunes then scrambled and slid down a steep sandy path to the shore.

The track that leads towards the dunes.



It is a long stretch of beach and there was nobody else there. Just us and the oystercatchers.  They had left their footprints everywhere.



We walked along the shore to our left as P was interested to see the remains of the old WWII RAF tower, left from when this area was used for bombing training practice.


We came across a lonely clump of harebells growing amongst the dune grasses.

As we walked back along the beach we realised that it was going to be difficult to identify the path back up to where we left the car. The dunes all looked the same.  Fortunately, P remembered seeing a piece of flotsam, some green nylon netting, that was close to the path so we made it back just before the rain came.

We drove back, just stopping for coffee and a shared chocolate chip flapjack in Conrod's Coffee Shop on the way home.


26 comments:

  1. How nice to have the beach to yourself for a beautiful morning walk! Thank goodness for P's sharp eyes so you could find your way back to your car. You will have to remember to mark the trail next time you visit!

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  2. Just been reading about the Spitfires and Hurricanes stationed at Jurby were used to protect Liverpool and Belfast after the fall of France. It looks a fascinating place.

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    1. Yes, there was a lot going on at RAF Jurby back then. I think it was eventually closed in the 1960s.

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  3. OK not your classical holiday beach but it looks fabulous and interesting and invitingly untrammeled - other than by oyster catchers. Their cries give a place a really windswept feel don't they.

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    1. Ha, yes, not exactly a tropical paradise type of beach but it does have a wild beauty and, yes, the oystercatcher cries are also quite captivating. We were very pleased to be sharing the beach with them.

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  4. A nice excursion. My favorite kind: no people. :)

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  5. Oooh thankyou - OH's g.grandfather lived in Jurby before coming to the UK to live, so he would have known that beach, for sure. Glad you found your way back to the car before the rain and love those Harebells.

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    1. He may have been more familiar with Jurby beach then perhaps, just a little further along the coast. They are all fabulous places though. I can just imagine what it would have been like in his day - even more solitary!

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  6. Lovely inspiring place, but isn't 12 minutes a moderate length drive on the IoM?

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    1. Perhaps we should have packed a picnic.

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  7. I love beaches like that, where the tide sorts everything into different layers; sand, pebbles, flotsam, etc. I could walk there all day long (as long as the weather stayed fine).

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  8. It is quite a long stretch of beach so you could easily spend an hour or two just strolling along it.

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  9. That's a lovely untouched beach. Perfect for walking and watching for treasures in the flotsam and jetsam. Lucky you found your way back. I would be panicking!

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    1. It was a little disconcerting on the way back to look up at the dunes and realise we couldn't easiky identify the path back up.

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  10. The harebells are so pretty. There are lots of them on the local common ( Nomansland) where I walk with the dog.

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    1. These were just growing in a small clump right amongst the grass in the dunes. Not sure how they got there.

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  11. For a relatively small island, The Isle of Man has so much variety, so much history and so much to see. Until I read this blogpost, I thought that "blue point" was the end of a biro.

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    1. Yep. It has always been a busy sort of place, especially once all those marauding Vikings showed up.

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  12. What a lovely deserted beach with not a crowd in swimsuits in sight! I can just feel the wind in my hair.

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    1. You would do tomorrow. We are forecast strong winds and rain!

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  13. Flapjack and harebells - like being on holiday all the time!

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    1. It is! We even have the typical British seaside holiday weather to go with it now. Wet, wet, wet.

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  14. I envy you and Northsider and Mark from 'BikeShed' and gz...I'd love to live near the ocean.

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    1. There is something quite soothing about walking along the seashore, watching the waves lapping and listening to those oystercatchers.

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Although I am quite used to talking to myself, any comments on my posts are very welcome, provided they are not abusive. I do reply to them so please check back. It's good to talk (!)