Joy and Diversity

Yesterday, on my little bus trip into Douglas, I was struck, for totally different reasons,  by two blogger's posts that I had recently read:  Yorkshire Pudding's observations about the differences in cultural diversity in various parts of the UK  and Rachel's comment on her blog What is the Joy of Living?

We had taken the trip into Douglas to visit the Government Planning Department to view the original plans for the conversion of our house. As these are twenty years old now, they are only available on microfiche so we had to sit at the machine in the reception area and peer at the dark and fuzzy images on the small screen in order to make out the details.  Unfortunately, the scanned documents appeared to be incomplete and some of the technical stuff seemed to be missing.  We did glean some information, however, so it was not a totally wasted visit.

We also did some shopping and had a coffee, to make a day of it.

Anyway, this is when YP's blog post about diversity struck me. Although our island is very small compared to the UK, our population has very quickly grown in ethnic and cultural diversity over the past couple of years.  It was apparent just walking through town and visiting shops and cafes that there is a very wide mix of new residents. We have many different colours and creeds here now whereas up until very recently the island was made up predominantly of white Manx, UK and Irish nationalities.

The young lady at the reception desk in the Government office was of Eastern Europe origin, as are some of the staff we speak to over the 'phone at the bank and building contractor offices.  There are many different nationalities working in our health care services and I have also seen quite a few different nationalities working on the local fishing boats too.

I thought about YP's observations that, across in the UK, this does not seem to be the case in areas outside of London and the surrounding areas of other cities but we certainly seem to be welcoming many different people here to bolster our population.

As we were ensconced in our seats on the bus home I was gazing out of the window and, once free from the gritty environs of Douglas, was enjoying the view of the rolling green hills and sea cliffs as we bowled along.  I had a moment of total contentment, feeling fortunate to be reasonably fit and healthy and to live in a relatively safe, quiet and beautiful place with just enough money to feed, clothe and warm ourselves .... so far, 

That is when Rachel's comment on What is the Joy of Living?  came to me. At that particular moment I felt that was my version of it.


25 comments:

  1. YP has stirred up a hornet nest over there hasn’t he. We’ve been away now for almost 50yrs and I didn’t realise there was still a ‘this is me, I’m not like that, and I don’t want to be served up all this other stuff’ attitude in parts of the UK.
    It’s good to hear you are comfortable living in your mixed nations environment - long may you feel that way!

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    1. I hope so too, although with our increase in population we are also seeing an increase in crime. Nowhere is perfect is it?

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    2. No, I have not stirred up a hornets' nest. What a daft thing to say.

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  2. I feel that the more we see or meet a variety of people, the more we learn how much we have in common. I am glad you have a joy of living, JayCee!

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    1. Sometimes my feeling of joy can take a knock for a while but I generally find I can bounce back.
      You seem to be a joyful person Ellen x

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  3. lots of the incomers to our community in UK bemoaned the fact that a certain criminal element followed them and got them all a bad name. By far the largest percentage of immigrants work damned hard and contribute hugely to their adopted communities.

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    1. Yes, there are good and bad elements everywhere but the bad get noticed more.

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  4. And perhaps blogging can play a part too - both in sharing a diversity of perspectives and in helping us see (and share as well) what is joyful in life.

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    1. I agree. Blogging has introduced me to many different lives with varying view and perspectives. More than if I had not joined this community.

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  5. Good blog observations by you and Mark, JayCee.

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  6. As long as one is happy and content wherever one is then what more is there to wish for?

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  7. I was prompted to write the post because of firstly Joan Eardley, the artist, and her simple life, and secondly, reading Descartes and the dream that he had which said he had to stop what he was doing and go back to basics. I am glad you liked the post and it made you think. I think Joan Eardley had a good life without the need to be surrounded by material things. xx

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    1. Yes, material things may perhaps offer a level of comfort but are not a guarantee of joy.

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  8. I really loved this post JayCee. It is a wonderful feeling to simply 'be' and to be content to be.

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    1. Thank you Debby. I do get the opposite feeling now and then but, thankfully, not often.

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  9. I enjoyed your post too Jaycee, and I'm so glad you found contentment - it's such a precious thing.
    I can't access Rachel's blog, so have no idea of her comments.

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    1. Thank you CG. It is indeed precious and not always guaranteed to last for ever.

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  10. I enjoy your blog and comments from others of different nations, the diversity. Having only ever lived in a tiny village in SW England my whole life I rarely meet people different in creed or colour from myself but thankfully that is changing now as we have Eastern European families moving in, going to the village school and generally joining in activities , it makes an interesting cultural mix. Sarah Browne.

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    1. Hello Sarah. Welcome, and thank you for your comment.
      I grew up in a London suburb in the 1960s and 70s so was quite used to a very varied cultural and ethnic mix back then.
      Here, for the 30 years we have lived on the island, it has been quite different until recently.

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  11. I value the great variety of human life and have visited over fifty countries, working for a while in several of them. Immigrants to Britain and asylum seekers have brought a wealth of cultural diversity but this does not negate my belief that media in general and TV advertising in particular should be representative and not skewed. Great swathes of this kingdom remain Anglo-Saxon and it is deceptive to ignore that fact. So many poor and working class families have been sidelined for generations. Population statistics speak clearly and truly about Britain's ethnic jigsaw.

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  12. Here, on our small island, there has been rapid change. It is interesting to see how cultures change and develop with immigration.

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  13. A very interesting post. I grew up in London and when I first came to Bedford in 1981; I was struck by the racial and cultural diversity that was apparent just by walking around the bus station area.

    The Open University used Bedford as a case study in one of their Social Science modules calling it a 'Heinz' community (or something like that) as there were 57 languages recorded as being spoken in the area!

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    1. The estate where I grew up close to Heathrow was like a mini United Nations.

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